$2 million up for grabs for democracy projects in Cuba

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The U.S. Agency for International Development is offering up to $2 million for new democracy-promotion programs in Cuba. USAID’s goals are to:

  • “Advance the effectiveness of independent civil society groups” that are pushing for “greater human rights and freedoms,” and
  • “Develop broader coalitions to expand civil society’s impact.”

Grants will range from $500,000 to $1 million each. The application deadline is 5 p.m. July 30. U.S. or foreign nongovernmental organizations may apply. The grant announcement states:

USAID is seeking applicants to identify unrecognized and unmet needs of Cuban civil society in its pursuit of human rights and democratic values. Applicants are encouraged to propose innovative yet realistic approaches that are most appropriate in the context of the presented issues as well as methods by which new approaches will be analyzed and adapted as needed throughout implementation.
Applicants should outline how the beneficiaries will be selected and prioritized and clearly explain how their local partners and local networks have the expertise, geographic and political familiarity, and experience to carry out activities. Applicants should also demonstrate how relationships will be built with the beneficiaries, and how their proposed program will coordinate to prevent duplication and ensure complementarities with other U.S. Government programs.

U.S. officials say applicants should be aware of the risks of operating in Cuba. The agency “cannot be held responsible for any injury or inconvenience suffered by individuals traveling to the island under USAID grant funding,” the grant announcement states.
“Working in a closed society, such as Cuba, presents particular challenges and risks to the Recipient (including its subrecipients, consultants, etc.). The U.S. government cannot ensure the safety and security of Recipient assets and personnel, particularly as relates to individuals traveling to Cuba under USAID funding, or project staff based in Cuba. Implementation of USAID programs in Cuba requires Recipient awareness of political sensitivities and assumption of risks associated with hostile actions of the Cuban government.”
The agency goes a step further to distance itself from NGOs it finances, saying:
“The Recipient will not serve as an agent or act under the direction of USAID and will be responsible for the efficient and effective administration of its own programs with sound business judgment, including any precautions inherent therein. To the extent not prohibited or contradicted elsewhere by Federal law, regulation, or policy, the Recipient shall not hold USAID liable for injury, death, detainment, incarceration, kidnapping, property loss, damages, or expenses incidental to those liabilities, suffered by, or attributable to the acts, omissions or negligence of, the Recipient, its agents, or its employees implementing programs in Cuba under this NOFO (Notice of Funding Opportunity).”
USAID also says NGOs should avoid sending U.S. citizens to Cuba.

Special thought and consideration should be given to the selection of consultants and other individuals who may be required to travel to Cuba. It is preferable for these travelers to speak Spanish fluently, possess a solid understanding of the cultural context, and have prior experience on the island, in order to maximize their effectiveness in this unique operating environment. To the extent possible, travel by U.S. citizens should be avoided.

To help maintain a low profile in Cuba, NGOs aren’t required to add USAID markings to materials distributed on the island.
“Due to the political sensitivity of the USAID Cuba Program, USAID does not require any attribution to USAID or to the U.S. Government in any materials that will be distributed on the island,” the agency states.
U.S. officials over the years have tried to ensure that program funds and supplies don’t benefit Cuba’s socialist government, but the grant announcement says it’s OK if NGOs provide aid to Cuban government employees when they are not on duty.
“Employees of the Government of Cuba… are also ineligible for assistance under this Cooperative Agreement while working in their official capacities. However, such persons, while not working in their official capacities as employees of the Cuban Government, are considered as individuals and are eligible for assistance. Furthermore, merely providing information on transitions to democracy, human rights, and market economies to individuals who are Cuban Government employees is not considered assistance to the Cuban Government, because the information is offered to these persons as individuals, and does not benefit the current Government of Cuba.”

The announcement is below:

Notice of Funding Opportunity Number: 7200AA21RFA00024

Program Title: Supporting Local Civil Society and Human Rights in Cuba

Federal Assistance Listing Number: 98.001 “USAID Foreign Assistance for Programs Overseas”

BACKGROUND

The past several months have served as a watershed moment for Cubans demanding greater democratic freedoms and respect for human rights. Artists and musicians have taken to the streets to protest government repression, producing anthems such as “Patria y Vida,” which has not only brought greater global awareness to the plight of the Cuban people but also served as a rallying cry for change on the island.

Religious leaders from multiple denominations are speaking out for freedom of religion and inspiring their congregations to do the same. Minority groups such as the LGBTQI+ community call for greater respect while Afro-Cubans demand better living conditions in their communities. Citizens are mobilizing not only in favor of greater political and social rights but for bread and butter issues that affect their daily lives. As the COVID-19 pandemic further isolated the island and increased calls for government response, these demands were met with enhanced government repression, arbitrary detentions, and other means of crackdowns.

The United States Government (USG) stands with the Cuban people in their desire for a free, democratic, and open society that supports the human rights of all Cuban citizens. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) remains committed to empowering the Cuban people to determine their own future.

The overarching goal of U.S. support in Cuba is to realize internationally recognized civil, political, religious, labor, and other rights as set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international instruments. The United States Government seeks to promote a stable, prosperous, and free country for the Cuban people.
The Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (Libertad) Act of 1996 authorizes support for democracy-building efforts in Cuba. Under this authority, USAID supports a portfolio of programs that:

  • provide basic needs assistance to victims of repression, including political prisoners, their family members, and other individuals who are persecuted because of their political or religious beliefs;
  • support human rights, fundamental freedoms and democratic values by strengthening civil society through training on leadership skills, community organizing, outreach, and documenting human rights violations; and
  • facilitate the free flow of information to, from, and within the island.

This NOFO seeks to fund activities to support human rights, fundamental freedoms and democratic values.
USAID’s approach to human rights is deliberately broad, encompassing democratic rights and freedoms as well as social rights. In that sense, USAID is prepared to support efforts to promote religious freedom, freedom of expression, labor rights, and LGBTQI+ inclusion, among others. Groups supporting these areas contribute to an expanding public sphere in Cuba that includes traditional and non-traditional advocacy. While USAID ultimately seeks to support fundamental freedoms and democratic values, activism towards such freedoms may take many forms. In that sense, USAID seeks to support a wide array of groups organizing around priority issues on the island.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

Under this award and subject to the availability of funds, USAID intends to provide up to $2 million in total USAID funding over a three-year period. USAID anticipates one to two awards ranging from $500,000 to $1 million each. Each organization may submit only one application and is eligible for only one cooperative agreement. The Office of Cuban Affairs of the USAID Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC/Cuba) reserves the right to lessen the scope or reduce costs as appropriate.

GOAL

The overarching goal of the Program is to realize within Cuba internationally recognized, civil, religious and labor rights as set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international instruments.

OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES

To advance the goal, USAID proposes two objectives:

(1) Advance the effectiveness of independent civil society groups to advocate for greater human rights and freedoms. While many organizations have historically advocated for greater freedom on the island, many Cubans shy away from traditional forms of advocacy. Nonetheless, recent efforts by faith-based organizations, artists and other marginalized groups demonstrate the Cuban people’s burgeoning willingness to demand accountability, and greater respect for human rights. By incorporating a wider pool of groups as part of citizens’ demands, civil society can effectively expand its ranks, while also raising awareness of the Cuban government’s failings, which span both political and social rights. USAID seeks to support these groups in their demands for greater democratic rights and freedoms.

Illustrative activities under this objective may include but are not limited to:

  • Improving the capacity of nascent and existing independent civil society organizations, professional associations, and other groups promoting human rights, including faith- based, labor, and other groups.
  • Supporting local-level leadership, communication and organizational skills to develop, defend, and promote human rights and freedoms.
  • Increasing grassroots community engagement in local problem-solving throughout the island.

(2) Develop broader coalitions to expand civil society’s impact. Recognizing the courage and commitment of the many individual civil society and human rights organizations on the island, their impact is nevertheless limited by geography or the inability to function as a broader network. To that end, USAID supports efforts to strengthen Cuban civil
society’s ability to develop multi-sector coalitions and thereby enhance their effectiveness.

Illustrative activities under this objective may include but are not limited to:

  • Strengthening and facilitating the creation of issue-based and cross-sectoral networks to support marginalized and vulnerable populations, including but not limited to youth, women, LGBTQI+, religious leaders, artists, musicians, and individuals of Afro-Cuban descent.
  • Fostering solidarity and cohesion among groups by increasing inter-group coordination, communication, and recognition of similar basic goals and principles.
  • Expanding civil society and human rights activism.

Applicants should outline how beneficiaries will be selected and prioritized and clearly explain how their local partners and local networks have the expertise, geographic reach and experience to carry out activities (see Section C.3. Partnerships). To maintain appropriate oversight and management and to avoid potential overlap and duplication of efforts, award recipients will be expected to coordinate and collaborate on activities with other U.S. Government program implementers. USAID shall not fund activities deemed to be duplicative with existing U.S. Government Cuba projects and activities.

 

RELATIONSHIP TO USG STRATEGIES AND PROGRAMS

Through various activities implemented by LAC/Cuba, as well as the Department of State’s Bureaus for Western Hemisphere Affairs (WHA) and Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL), the U.S. Government provides ongoing support to targeted beneficiaries throughout the island to achieve its foreign policy goals. To avoid duplication of efforts, LAC/Cuba communicates regularly with the Department of State to ensure that programming is well coordinated with existing projects.

The United States seeks a stable, prosperous, and free country for the Cuban people. The United States pursues limited engagement with Cuba that advances our national interests and empowers the Cuban people while restricting economic practices that disproportionately benefit the Cuban government or its military, intelligence, or security agencies at the expense of the Cuban people. The U.S. government seeks to promote human rights, religious freedom, and democracy, encourages the development of civil society, and engages in areas that advance the interests of the United States and the Cuban people.

The civil society and human rights support program proposed in this NOFO intends to build upon prior efforts while allowing for innovation and coordination within the interagency. At the conclusion of the Program, Cuban civil society will be better capable of advocating on human rights and freedoms and will demonstrate improved coordination within various groups.

AUTHORIZING LEGISLATION AND APPLICABLE REGULATIONS AND POLICIES

The authority for this NOFO and any resulting award is from the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended. Additionally, there are two statutes that are particularly critical in providing authority, notwithstanding other provisions of law, for USAID’s work in Cuba: (1) Section 109(a) of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (Libertad) Act of 1996 (also referred to as “Helms-Burton Act,” P.L. 104-114); and (2) Section 1705 of the Cuban Democracy Act of 1992 (22 U.S.C. §6004) (P.L. 102-484). Activities authorized and financed under this program are governed and limited by the terms of these two acts.

The Libertad Act of 1996 provides authority to furnish assistance and provide other support for individuals and independent non-governmental organizations to support democracy-building efforts for Cuba, including: (1) published and informational matter to be made available to independent democratic groups in Cuba, (2) humanitarian assistance to victims of political repression and their families, and (3) support for democratic and human rights groups in Cuba.

The Cuban Democracy Act of 1992 authorizes the provision of certain assistance notwithstanding any other provision of law. Specifically, this provision authorizes donations of food to non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or individuals in Cuba, exports of medicines and medical supplies generally, and assistance through appropriate NGOs for the support of individuals and organizations promoting nonviolent democratic change in Cuba.

The following link contains the full text of the Libertad Act: https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/126/libertad.pdf

The following link contains the full text of the Cuban Democracy Act (CDA): https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/126/cda.pdf

Applicants must closely monitor, track, verify, and report to USAID on the end-use of all materials sent to Cuba. LAC/Cuba is covered by a general license issued by the Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC). The general license, which covers USAID activities, is issued under the Cuban Assets Control Regulations, 31 CFR §515, last amended in October 2020 and available at https://ecfr.federalregister.gov/current/title-31/subtitle-B/chapter- V/part-515. Further information and updates to the OFAC license are available at https://home.treasury.gov/policy-issues/financial-sanctions/sanctions-programs-and-country- information/cuba-sanctions. Successful Applicants will be required to obtain an applicable Department of Commerce license if necessary, consistent with the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR Parts 740 and 746). Of particular note is the Department of Commerce
license exception “Support for the Cuban People” found at 15 CFR § 740.21. Information regarding U.S./Cuba legal and/or policy requirements may be found on the following websites:

U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control – Cuba Sanctions https://home.treasury.gov/policy- issues/financial-sanctions/sanctions-programs-and-country-information/cuba-sanctions
U.S. Department of Commerce Cuba page for exports: https://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/policy-guidance/country-guidance/sanctioned- destinations/cuba
State Department Fact Sheet on U.S. Relations With Cuba: https://www.state.gov/u-s-relations-with-cuba/ https://www.state.gov/countries- areas/cuba/
USAID and Assistance Awards Policies: https://www.usaid.gov/ads/policy/300/303

Applicants should also understand that, given the nature of the Cuban government, USAID cannot be held responsible for any injury or inconvenience suffered by individuals traveling to the island under USAID grant funding.

Note: The term “program” as used in 2 CFR 200 and this NOFO is typically considered by USAID to be an Activity supporting one or more Project(s) pursuant to specific Development Objectives. Please see 2 CFR 700 for the USAID specific definitions of the terms “Activity” and “Project” as used in the USAID context for purposes of planning, design, and implementation of USAID development assistance.

[END OF SECTION A]

SECTION B: FEDERAL AWARD INFORMATION

Estimate of Funds Available and Number of Awards Contemplated

Under this NOFO and subject to the availability of funds, USAID intends to award one or two Cooperative Agreements pursuant to this NOFO, ranging from $500,000 to $1 million each for up to a three-year period of performance. Organizations may not submit more than one application and each organization is eligible for only one Cooperative Agreement under this award. Organizations that have not previously received funding from USAID are encouraged to apply. USAID will not fund research or feasibility studies intended to strengthen an organization’s understanding of the Cuban context.

USAID/Cuba reserves the right to negotiate to lessen or increase the scope or adjust costs as appropriate. The status of ongoing U.S. Government-funded Cuba programs will be taken into consideration when awarding funds under this NOFO.

Performance Indicators, Targets, Baseline Data, and Data Collection

Data will be collected by the implementing partner based on the illustrative list of performance indicators below. Applicants may propose any of these indicators based on their applications as well as additional custom indicators.
DR.4-1 Number of U.S. Government-supported activities designed to promote or strengthen the civic participation of women
DR.4-2 Number of Politically Marginalized Individuals Receiving USG Assistance
DR.4.2-1 Number of human rights organizations trained and supported
DR.4.2-2 Number of civil society organizations (CSOs) receiving USG assistance engaged in advocacy interventions
DR.6.1-2 Number of human rights defenders trained and supported
CUST Number of Initiatives that Support Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms as a Result of USG-Supported Interventions
CUST Number of individuals who participate in civic activities with U.S. Government’s support

Start Date and Period of Performance of Federal Awards

The estimated start date will be upon signature of the award, on or about October 1, 2021. The period of performance anticipated shall be up to 36 months.

Substantial Involvement for Cooperative Agreements

USAID will be substantially involved in the program and management performance of any awarded Cooperative Agreement through technical collaboration on specified program
interventions. USAID anticipates the award shall be a Cooperative Agreement. Substantial involvement under the award is expected to be as follows:

Approval of the Recipient’s Implementation Plan, Annual Workplan, and Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (MEL) Plan;
Approval of Specified Key Personnel;
Agency and recipient collaboration or joint participation in cases when the recipient’s successful accomplishment of program objectives would benefit from USAID’s technical knowledge;
Monitoring to authorize specified kinds of direction or redirection because of interrelationships with other projects or activities funded by the USG; and
Concurrence on the substantive provisions of sub-awards. 2 CFR 200.308(6) requires the recipient to obtain the AO’s prior approval for the sub-award, transfer, or contracting out of any work under an award. Specifically, the requirements for prior approval of sub- awards include:
For the purposes of this award, the term “sub-award” means an award of financial assistance in the form of money, or property in lieu of money, made under an award by a recipient to an eligible sub-awardee or by a sub-awardee to a lower tier sub-awardee. The term includes financial assistance when provided by any legal agreement to implement program activities, even if the agreement is called a contract, consultant agreement or similar term, but does not include procurement of goods and services nor does it include any form of assistance which is excluded from the definition of “award” in 2 CFR 200.
“Sub-awardee” means the legal entity to which, or person to whom, a sub-award is made – even if that person or entity is called a contractor, subcontractor, sub- recipient or consultant – and which is accountable to the recipient for the use of the funds provided (2 CFR 200).
In accordance with 2 CFR 200, the sub-award, transfer, or contracting out of any work must be described in the application. To effectively describe all proposed sub-awards the recipient must provide the following:
Name of the sub-awardee, and (1) in the case of a for profit commercial organization, the place of incorporation; or (2) in the case of a partnership, the place where legally organized; or (3) in the case of a non-profit organization, the place where legally organized; or (4) in the case of a person, the country of citizenship or legal residence.
The program description, statement of work, or terms of reference; period of performance; and country of performance.
The total estimated cost, including a detailed line-item budget and budget narrative that also includes proposed cost share, if applicable, and a copy of any current indirect cost rate agreement between the U.S. Government and the sub-awardee. For individuals, the proposed daily rate, salary, stipend, or honorarium (whichever applies) and the program consultant’s curriculum vitae.
The sub-awardee must submit any of the following requests to the USAID Agreement Officer, through the prime recipient, for approval:
Requests to enter further sub-awards or sub-contracts, including sub- contracts with program consultants.
Approval to purchase commodities.

Authorized Geographic Code

The geographic code for the procurement of commodities and services under this program is Code 937 (the United States, the recipient country, and developing countries other than advanced developing countries, but excluding any country that is a prohibited source).

Nature of the Relationship between USAID and the Recipient

The principal purpose of the relationship with Recipient and under the subject program is to transfer funds to accomplish a public purpose of support or stimulation of the program “Supporting Local Civil Society and Human Rights in Cuba,” which is authorized by Federal statute. The successful Recipient will be responsible for ensuring the achievement of the program objectives and the efficient and effective administration of the award through the application and sound management practices. The Recipient will assume responsibility for administering Federal funds in a manner consistent with underlying agreements, program objectives, and the terms and conditions of the Federal award.

[END OF SECTION B]

SECTION C: ELIGIBILITY INFORMATION

Eligible Applicants

U.S. and non-U.S. nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are eligible to apply. USAID encourages applications from potential new partners with experience in Cuba or similarly closed societies. An NGO means any nongovernmental organization or entity, whether nonprofit or profit-making (22 CFR 203.2). USAID will not accept applications from individuals. All Applicants must be legally recognized organizational entities under applicable U.S. law.

Applicants must have established financial management, monitoring and evaluation processes, internal control systems, and policies and procedures that comply with established U.S. Government standards, laws, and regulations. The successful applicant(s) may be subject to a pre-award risk assessment (Pre-award Survey) by the AO.

Eligibility for this NOFO is not restricted.

Faith-based organizations are eligible to apply for federal financial assistance on the same basis as any other organization and are subject to the protections and requirements of Federal Law.

If profit-making organizations apply for funding under this NOFO, no profit or fee will be authorized under the activity.

Cost Sharing or Matching

Cost share refers to the resources a recipient contributes to the total cost of an agreement. Cost share becomes a condition of an award when it is part of the approved award budget. The cost share must be verifiable from the Recipient’s records and can be audited; for U.S. organizations it is subject to the requirements of 2 CFR 200.306, and for non-U.S. organizations it is subject to Standard Provision RAA14, “Cost Share,” in USAID’s Automated Directives System (ADS) 303mab, “Standard Provisions for Non-U.S. Nongovernmental Organizations.” If a Recipient does not meet its cost share requirement, the AO may apply the difference in actual cost share amount from the agreed upon amount to reduce the amount of USAID funding for the following funding period, require the recipient to refund the difference to USAID when the award expires or is terminated, or reduce the amount of cost share required under the award.

The provision of cost share under this program is voluntary but not required. At their discretion, applicants may propose a cost share in cash, in-kind, or a combination of both. All cash and in-kind contributions committed by partners must be documented.

Partnerships

USAID will consider applications that include proposed partners (sub-recipients) for implementation of this award. Applicants are encouraged to partner with organizations that show a complementarity of skill sets and capabilities. Partners may leverage the private sector, other donors, international organizations, and civil society institutions, if appropriate. Please note that Applicants are not encouraged to partner with organizations that will require organizational capacity building. Rather, USAID seeks recipient organizations that have prior commendable performance in Cuba or other closed societies, with a preference for experience in Cuba. Subject matter experience by the prime recipient or sub-recipients in implementing similar programs is also preferred.

If an Applicant includes sub-recipients for implementation of the award, Applicants should demonstrate how these sub-recipients complement the organizational capabilities of the Applicant and how the partnerships strengthen the overall program plan.

While each member of the partnership should have a defined role under the agreement, the Prime Recipient is responsible for all administrative, management, and reporting requirements to USAID. Applicants should describe their proposed partnership(s), each partner organization, its strengths and experiences, its proposed role and responsibilities, and associated costs. The application should also explain how the Applicant will ensure the effective implementation of all program activities set forth in its proposal (including those carried out through sub-awards) and the delivery of timely and accurate reports among partner organizations. References for the past performance of each partner organization should also be provided.

[END OF SECTION C]

SECTION D: APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INFORMATION
Agency Point of Contact: Maria Munoz
Agreement Officer
mamunoz@usaid.gov USAID/M/OAA/SIDP
1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington, DC 20523

Questions and Submission Procedures

Questions regarding this NOFO should be submitted in writing to the email address specified here: mamunoz@usaid.gov no later than the date and time indicated on the cover letter, as amended. Any information given to a prospective Applicant concerning this NOFO will be furnished promptly to all other prospective Applicants as an amendment to this NOFO, if that information is necessary in submitting applications or if the lack of it would be prejudicial to any other prospective Applicant.

General Content and Form of Application

Applications must be submitted electronically to the following address: mamunoz@usaid.gov on or before the date and time indicated on the cover letter. The e-mail must be identified with the following subject heading: “USAID/Cuba NOFO No.7200AA21RFA00024 and the Applicant’s Name”

Preparation of Applications:

Each Applicant must furnish the information required by this NOFO. Applications must be submitted in two separate parts: (a) Technical Application, and (b) Business (Cost) Application. This subsection addresses general content requirements applying to the full application. Please see subsections 5 and 6, below, for information on the content specific to the Technical and Business (Cost) applications. The Technical application must address technical aspects only while the Business (Cost) Application must present the costs, and address risk and other related issues.

Both the Technical and Business (Cost) Applications must include a cover page containing the following information:
Name of the organization(s) submitting the application;
Identification and signature of the primary contact person (by name, title, organization, mailing address, telephone number and email address) and the identification of the alternate contact person (by name, title, organization, mailing address, telephone number and email address);
Program name
Notice of Funding Opportunity number
Name of any proposed sub-recipients or partnerships (identify if any of the organizations are local organizations, per USAID’s definition of ‘local entity’ under ADS 303).

Any erasures or other changes to the application must be initialed by the person signing the application. Applications signed by an agent on behalf of the applicant must be accompanied by evidence of that agent’s authority, unless that evidence has been previously furnished to the issuing office.

Applicants may choose to submit a cover letter in addition to the cover pages, but it will serve only as a transmittal letter to the Agreement Officer. The cover letter will not be reviewed as part of the merit review criteria.

Applications must comply with the following:
USAID will not review any pages in excess of the page limits noted in the subsequent sections. Please ensure that applications comply with the page limitations.
Written in English.
Use standard 8½” x 11”, single sided, single-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman font, 1” margins, left justification and headers and/or footers on each page including consecutive page numbers, date of submission, and applicant’s name.
A 10 point font can be used for graphs and charts. Tables, however, must comply with the 12 point Times New Roman requirement.
Submitted via Microsoft Word or PDF formats, except budget files which must be submitted in Microsoft Excel.
The estimated start date identified in Section B of this NOFO must be used in the cost application.
The technical application must be a searchable and editable Word or PDF format as appropriate.
The Cost Schedule must include an Excel spreadsheet with all cells unlocked and no hidden formulas or sheets. A PDF version of the Excel spreadsheet may be submitted in addition to the Excel version at the applicant’s discretion, however, the official cost application submission is the unlocked Excel version.

Applicants must review, understand, and comply with all aspects of this NOFO. Failure to do so may be considered as being non-responsive and may be evaluated accordingly. Applicants should retain a copy of the application and all enclosures for their records.

Applicants who include data that they do not want disclosed to the public for any purpose or used by the U.S. Government except for evaluation purpose, should mark the title page with the following legend:

“This application includes data that shall not be disclosed outside the U.S. Government and shall not be duplicated, used, or disclosed – in whole or in part – for any purpose other than to evaluate this application. If, however, a grant is awarded to this Applicant as a result of – or in connection with – the submission of this data, the U.S. Government shall have the right to duplicate, use, or disclose the data to the extent provided in the resulting grant. This restriction does not limit the U.S. Government’s right to use information contained in this data if it is obtained from another source without restriction.”

and

Mark each sheet of restricted data with the following legend:

“Use or disclosure of data contained on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this application.”

Application Submission Procedures

Applications must be submitted by email to mamunoz@usaid.gov. Email submissions must include the NOFO number and applicant’s name in the subject line heading. In addition, for an application sent by multiple emails, the subject line must also indicate whether the email relates to the technical or cost application, and the desired sequence of the emails and their attachments (e.g. “No. 1 of 4”, etc.). For example, if your cost application is being sent in two emails, the first email should have a subject line that states: “[USAID/Cuba NOFO No. 7200AA21RFA00024], [organization name], Cost Application, Part 1 of 2.”

USAID’s preference is that the technical application and the cost application each be submitted as consolidated email attachments, (e.g. that you consolidate the various parts of a technical application into a single document before sending it). If this is not possible, please provide instructions on how to collate the attachments. USAID will not be responsible for errors in compiling electronic applications if no instructions are provided or are unclear. All applications received by the submission deadline will be reviewed for responsiveness to the NOFO and the application format. No additions or modifications will be accepted after the submission date.

After submitting an application electronically, applicants should immediately check their own email to confirm that the attachments were indeed sent. If an applicant discovers an error in transmission, please send the material again and note in the subject line of the email or indicate in the file name if submitted via grants.gov that it is a “corrected” submission. Do not send the same email more than once unless there has been a change, and if so, please note that it is a “corrected” email.

Applicants are reminded that email is NOT instantaneous, and in some cases delays of several hours occur from transmission to receipt. Therefore, applicants are requested to send the application in sufficient time ahead of the deadline. For this NOFO, the initial point of entry to the government infrastructure is the USAID mail server. There may be a problem with the receipt of *.zip files due to anti-virus software. Therefore, applicants are discouraged from sending files in this format as USAID LAC/Cuba cannot guarantee their acceptance by the internet server.

Technical Application Format

The technical application will be the most important factor for consideration in selection for award of the proposed Cooperative Agreement(s). The technical application should be specific, complete and presented concisely. The application should demonstrate the applicant’s capabilities and expertise with respect to achieving the goals of this program. The application should take into account the requirements of the program and merit review criteria found in this NOFO.

Technical applications must not exceed ten (10) single-spaced typed pages, using Times New
Roman 12pt. font, typed on standard 8½” x11” sized paper with one-inch margins (both right and left) and each page numbered consecutively.

Annexes are excluded from the ten (10) page limitation.

Applicants are advised that any pages exceeding the page limit will not be considered for evaluation.

Applicants should outline how the beneficiaries will be selected and prioritized and clearly explain how their local partners and local networks have the expertise, geographic and political familiarity, and experience to carry out activities. Applicants should also demonstrate how relationships will be built with the beneficiaries, and how their proposed program will coordinate to prevent duplication and ensure complementarities with other U.S. Government programs.

The technical application must clearly demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the development challenges in context, outline specific activities and explain how the proposed activities would help achieve the program objectives stated in Section A. USAID is seeking applicants to identify unrecognized and unmet needs of Cuban civil society in its pursuit of human rights and democratic values. Applicants are encouraged to propose innovative yet realistic approaches that are most appropriate in the context of the presented issues as well as methods by which new approaches will be analyzed and adapted as needed throughout implementation.

The technical approach must clearly address the factors outlined in the evaluation criteria found in Section E.

All application documents must be in English.

Application Contents: The Technical Application, at a minimum, must contain the following. Please note that the Cover Page and Table of Contents do not count toward the ten (10) page limit:

Cover Page (not to exceed one page; does not count toward the ten (10) page limit. See Section D.3 above for requirements)
Table of Contents (not to exceed one page; does not count toward the ten (10) page limit). List all parts of the technical application, with page numbers and attachments.

Executive Summary (not to exceed two pages)
The Executive Summary must provide a high-level overview of key elements of the Technical Application, with: a) the proposed vision and goals for the program; b) the results to be achieved, the resources and steps required to meet them in an identifiable period of time; and c) the managerial approach and resources that the Applicant will bring to bear on the overall management of the program.

Technical Approach (not to exceed eight pages)
In this section, Applicants are not to merely repeat what is already described in this NOFO or in the Executive Summary. Applicants must focus on describing how they propose to achieve the program objective(s) and how the program will make a significant contribution toward achieving the development objectives of USAID as identified in the Program Description (Section A of this NOFO). Discuss your strategy, methodology, ideas for including stakeholders in setting the agenda, expected results, schedule of activities, programming of human resources, and performance indicators. Applications should describe any partner groups and/or individuals with whom Applicants wish to work, showing that any on-island partners demonstrate independence from Cuban government leadership, policies and financial support. This section should:

State the proposed program concept, strategy and techniques for accomplishing the objectives and expected results outlined in this NOFO. What aspect of the proposed program 1) seeks to identify unrecognized, unmet and demand driven needs of civil society in its pursuit of human rights and democratic values; and 2) what creative and innovative approaches in the design and implementation are being applied? Provide justification for the approach.

State the assumptions and address the inherent risks in implementing a program that promotes human rights in the Cuban context, based on prior experience working in closed societies or experience working in Cuba. Explain the possible challenges and how the Applicant plans to overcome these challenges.

Present and explain the role of any specialized human rights training (if applicable), taking into account how the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic may impact training
activities. How will the Applicant’s expertise be leveraged in the program to maximize program impact?

Present detailed, island-wide recruitment and vetting processes to ensure a balanced representation of marginalized communities, including youth, women, LGBTIQ+, and Afro-Cubans from civil society in this program.

Explain how activities will maximize the impact and amount of program funds spent on the island.
The following Annexes must be attached to the Technical Application and do not count toward the ten (10) page limit above:

Annex 1. Draft Implementation Plan (not to exceed three pages)
Clearly present a visual timeline, broken down by month, of the activities that will be used to implement the program, including milestones and key deliverables. The Implementation Plan should address any potential contingency plans should activities be affected by the ongoing global pandemic and/or other potential natural disasters.
Note: For reporting purposes, implementation plans for recipients and sub-recipients should mirror the USAID fiscal year, which begins October 1. A final Implementation Plan will be due within 60 days of a signed agreement.

Annex 2. Draft Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning (MEL) Plan (not to exceed three pages): Applicants are strongly encouraged to include the following components in their draft MEL Plan. A final MEL Plan must be submitted within 90 days of a signed agreement. Please see USAID ADS Chapter 201 (https://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/201.pdf) for additional information on USAID MEL requirements.-
A visual representation of the proposed Results Framework upon which the program’s theory of change is based;
Monitoring Section that includes the proposed monitoring approach, including monitoring processes, systems, and relevant performance indicators of the
activity’s outputs and outcomes, their baseline values (or plan for collecting baselines), and annual targets. The Applicant should also include expectations for collaboration with any external evaluations of the activity planned; plans for monitoring context and emerging risks that could affect the achievement of the
activity’s results.
Evaluation Section that describes how the Applicant plans to evaluate the program, including plans for data analysis, review, and reporting to measure program progress against overall objectives; any proposed internal or external evaluations;
Learning Section that describes how the Applicant will address learning questions or knowledge gaps and allow for adjustments as circumstances change or learning evolves;
The Applicant’s approach for establishing effective procedures for collecting and responding to feedback from beneficiaries and reporting to USAID a summary of beneficiary feedback;
A description of the Applicant’s plan for Data Management, including plans to collect data, maintain data quality, store data, ensure data security, and how the data will be used and analyzed; and a
Brief description of Roles and Responsibilities for MEL-related tasks, including across any proposed sub-recipients (if applicable).

Annex 3. Program Management Approach (not to exceed three pages): This section focuses on the management plan the Applicant will be using to implement the proposed program. This section also reviews the documentation required to meet the standards for
prior approval at the time of award for proposed sub-awards and program consultants. For this program, the Chief of Party (COP) and Key Personnel 2 (Title to be proposed by applicant) have been designated “Key Personnel.” The Key Personnel 2 position is critical in addressing continuity in the absence of the COP.

Explain the staffing plan and specify the composition and organizational structure of the entire implementation team. Also include a description of each staff member’s role, technical expertise, and estimated time (level of effort) that each will devote to the program. Applicants must propose the Key Personnel (Chief of Party and Key Personnel 2) and how they will contribute to achieving the program objectives. Proposing a diverse staff in terms of ethnic identity, sex, and gender would be an asset in the program designed to address the needs of under-represented groups. In addition to the specific qualifications for each key personnel, the Applicants must demonstrate how collectively as a team, the key personnel possess the skills set forth in the Program Description. Proposed personnel not yet identified may be shown as “TBD” (to be determined).

Key Personnel 1: Chief of Party (COP):
The COP, who should devote no less than 30 percent of their time to the proposed project, oversees all activities and provides overall technical oversight for the program. The COP is responsible for management, oversight, and reporting of implementation of, progress on and quality of performance related to sub-awards and technical assistance under this program. The COP serves as the designated person for overall management of the relationship with USAID. The COP supervises overall program operations, including administration, logistics, procurement, budgeting, and financial accounting (expenditures and reporting). In close consultation with the AOR, the COP ensures procedures are established and complied with for subaward worthiness, development, implementation and close- out, funds liquidity, procurement, and administrative actions. They have primary responsibility for overseeing the administrative aspects of management of all sub- awardees, and overseeing programmatic and strategic aspects of the program.
Ultimately, they are responsible for all sub-awards made under this agreement though they may delegate day-to-day management to appropriate staff. They are responsible for hiring staff and making sure that program operations comply with applicable laws.

Preferred Requirements:
At least ten years of experience managing and implementing similar development programs, with preferred experience working on Cuba democracy programs;
Demonstrated professional excellence, proven leadership, and management skills; and
Strong interpersonal skills with experience working in cross-cultural settings.

Key Personnel 2: [title to be proposed by applicants]:
Key Personnel 2 will help oversee program implementation (reporting to the COP) and logistics for all objectives of the program. They act as COP when the COP is absent and are responsible for duties delegated by the COP which may include monitoring, evaluation and learning of the program. In coordination with the COP, they will oversee day-to-day management systems for sub-awards. They manage the day-to-day office operations, including ensuring that USAID is notified of all planned travel. They are also responsible for making sure that program operations comply with applicable laws.

Preferred Requirements:
At least five years of experience working in closed countries and non-secure environments, with experience in Cuba, and in implementing similar activities.
Experience in monitoring and evaluation and experience working with sub- partners and beneficiaries is highly desired.

Provide the names and proposed roles and responsibilities of the key personnel proposed under this Cooperative Agreement.

Clearly present your management and administrative arrangements to include your management approach for the overall execution of the proposed activities, organizational structure, administrative arrangements, logistical support, and personnel management plan which describes functions and responsibilities of key personnel.

Describe the approaches to support collaboration, frequency of stakeholder engagement, and coordination between implementing partners, among other approaches. This may also include plans for operational arrangements for collaboration and coordination with USAID and the Department of State, and other partner institutions.

Describe all proposed sub-awards in the application. 2 CFR 200.308(6) requires the recipient to obtain the AO’s approval for the sub-award, transfer, or contracting out of any work under an award, including fixed amount subawards as described in §200.333. This provision does not apply to the acquisition of supplies, material, equipment or general support services. Specifically, the requirements for prior approval of sub-award include:

Name of the sub-awardee, and (1) in the case of a for-profit commercial organization, the place of incorporation; or (2) in the case of a partnership, the place where legally organized; or (3) in the case of a non-profit organization, the place where legally organized; or (4) in the case of a person, the country of citizenship or legal residence.
The program description, statement of work, or terms of reference; period of performance; and country of performance.
The total estimated cost, including a detailed line-item budget and budget narrative that also includes proposed cost share, if applicable, and a copy of any current indirect cost rate agreement between the U.S. Government and the sub- awardee. For individuals, the proposed daily rate, salary, stipend, or honorarium (whichever applies) and the program consultant’s curriculum vitae.
That the subawardee does not have active exclusions in the System for Award Management; does not appear on the Specially Designated Nationals (SDN) and Blocked Persons List; and is not listed in the United Nations Security designation list nor the Office of Foreign Nationals (SDN) and Blocked Persons List; and is not listed in the United Nations Security designation list nor the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) sanctions list.

Furthermore, if the prime award is made without the required documentation, the sub- award will not be considered approved unless all the above requirements are submitted to the Agreement Officer and the Recipient receives a signed letter approving the sub- award from the Agreement Officer.

Performance of a sub-award must not begin before the date of the Agreement Officer’s letter of approval or the date of the authorization by the prime recipient, whichever is later.

Annex 4. Key Personnel – Resumes (each resume must not exceed two pages): This section shall include resumes for all key personnel candidates and any other personnel proposed for significant positions. Resumes shall not exceed two pages in length and shall be in chronological order starting with the most recent experience. Resumes for all key personnel must include three performance references for each proposed key position, up-to-date telephone numbers and e-mail contact information.

Annex 5. Organizational Chart (not to exceed one page): The chart must show the staff reporting lines and relationships among the different positions.

Annex 6. Organizational Capacity (not to exceed two pages):This section focuses on the Applicant’s internal capabilities/resources and relevant work experience/history to demonstrate its capacity to successfully manage the proposed program. In this section, the Applicant should:

Explain the core technical capacities/resources and home office support that the Applicant has to offer and address the Applicant’s financial control systems.
Describe its ability to monitor and evaluate program implementation and to effectively report results and impact.
Provide a brief description of the Applicant’s work experience/history/areas of expertise, including previous experience working in closed societies or other challenging environments, with a preference for experience in Cuba.
Describe its pertinent work experience and representative accomplishments in developing and implementing programs similar to that outlined in this NOFO.
Describe the organizational capabilities and expertise of any proposed sub-recipients, if applicable.
If applicable, describe the proposed field management structure and financial controls.

Annex 7. Organization Matrix of Projects (not to exceed two pages): The Applicant must provide a matrix of all its contracts, grants, or cooperative agreements involving similar or related programs during the past three years. The reference information for these awards must include the performance location; title of award; brief description of the work performed; and dates of performance.

Annex 8. Cuba Commodities List (not to exceed two pages, if applicable)

Business (Cost) Application Format

The Business (Cost) Application must be submitted separately from the Technical Application. While no page limit exists for the full cost application, applicants are encouraged to be as concise as possible while still providing the necessary details. The business (cost) application must illustrate the entire period of performance, using the budget format shown in the SF-424A.

Prior to award, applicants may be required to submit additional documentation deemed necessary for the Agreement Officer to assess the applicant’s risk in accordance with 2 CFR 200.206.
Applicants should not submit any additional information with their initial application.

If the Applicant has established a consortium or another legal relationship among its partners, the Business (Cost) application must include a copy of the legal relationship between the parties.
The agreement should include a full discussion of the relationship between the Applicant and Sub-Applicant(s) including identification of the Applicant with whom USAID will work with for purposes of Agreement administration, identity of the Applicant which will have accounting responsibility, how agreement effort will be allocated and the express agreement of the principals thereto to be held jointly and severely liable for the acts or omissions of the other.

The Business (Cost )Application must contain the following sections:

Cover Page (See Section D.3 above for additional requirements)

SF 424 Form(s)
The applicant must sign and submit the cost application using the SF-424 series. Standard Forms (SFs) can be accessed electronically at www.grants.gov or using the following links:

Failure to accurately complete these forms could result in the rejection of the application.

Required Certifications and Assurances
The applicant must complete the following documents and submit a signed copy with their application upon request by the AO:

“Certifications, Assurances, Representations, and Other Statements of the Recipient” ADS 303mav document found at http://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/1868/303mav.pdf
Assurances for Non-Construction Programs (SF-424B)
Certificate of Compliance: Please submit a copy of your Certificate of Compliance if your organization’s systems have been certified by USAID/Washington’s Office of Acquisition and Assistance (M/OAA).

Budget and Budget Narrative
The Budget must be submitted as one unprotected Excel file (MS Office 2000 or later versions) with visible formulas and references and must be broken out by project year, including itemization of the federal and non-federal (cost share) amount. Files must not contain any hidden or otherwise inaccessible cells. Budgets with hidden cells lengthen the cost analysis time required to make an award, and may result in a rejection of the cost application. The Budget Narrative must contain sufficient detail to allow USAID to understand the proposed costs. The applicant must ensure the budgeted costs address any additional requirements identified in Section F, such as Branding and Marking. The Budget Narrative must be thorough, including sources for costs to support USAID’s determination that the proposed costs are fair and reasonable.

The Budget must include the following worksheets or tabs, and contents, at a minimum:

Summary Budget, inclusive of all program costs (federal and non-federal), broken out by major budget category and by year for activities implemented by the applicant and any potential sub-applicants for the entire period of the program. See Section H, Annex 1 for Summary Budget Template
Detailed Budget, including a breakdown by year, sufficient to allow the Agency to determine that the costs represent a realistic and efficient use of funding to implement the applicant’s program and are allowable in accordance with the cost principles found in 2 CFR 200 Subpart E.
Detailed Budgets for each sub-recipient, for all federal funding and cost share, broken out by budget category and by year, for the entire implementation period of the project.

The Detailed Budget must contain the following budget categories and information, at a minimum:

Salaries and Allowances – Must be proposed consistent with 2 CFR 200.430 Compensation – Personal Services. The applicant’s budget must include position title, salary rate, level of effort, and salary escalation factors for each position. Allowances, when proposed, must be broken down by specific type and by position. Applicants must explain all assumptions in the Budget Narrative. The Budget Narrative must demonstrate that the proposed compensation is reasonable for the services rendered and consistent with what is paid for similar work in other activities of the applicant. Applicants must provide their established written policies on personnel compensation. If the applicant’s written policies do not address a specific element of compensation that is being proposed, the Budget Narrative must describe the rationale used and supporting market research.

Fringe Benefits – (if applicable) If the applicant has a fringe benefit rate approved by an agency of the U.S. Government, the applicant must use such rate and provide evidence of its approval. If an applicant does not have a fringe benefit rate approved, the applicant must propose a rate and explain how the applicant determined the rate. In this case, the Budget Narrative must include a detailed breakdown of all items related to fringe benefits (e.g., superannuation, gratuity, etc.) and the costs of each, expressed in U.S. dollars and as a percentage of salaries.

Travel and Transportation – Provide details to explain the purpose of the trips, the number of trips, the origin and destination, the number of individuals traveling, and the duration of the trips. Per Diem and associated travel costs must be based on the applicant’s normal travel policies. When appropriate, please provide supporting documentation as an attachment, such as company travel policy, and explain assumptions in the Budget Narrative.

Procurement or Rental of Goods (Equipment & Supplies), Services, and Real Property – Must include information on estimated types of equipment, models, supplies and the cost per unit and quantity. The Budget Narrative must include the purpose of the equipment and supplies and the basis for the estimates. The Budget Narrative must support the necessity of any rental costs and reasonableness in light of such factors as: rental costs of comparable property, if any; market conditions in the area; alternatives available; and the type, life expectancy, condition, and value of the property leased.

Subawards – Specify the budget for the portion of the program to be passed through to any subrecipients. See 2 CFR 200 for assistance in determining whether the sub-tier entity is a subrecipient or contractor. The subrecipient budgets must align with the same requirements as the applicant’s budget, including those related to fringe and indirect costs.
7 Seminars and Conferences – The applicant will indicate the subject, venue and duration of proposed conferences and seminars, and their relationship to the objectives of the program, along with estimates of costs.

Cost Share and Leverage – Please provide details on any proposed cost share and/or leverage contributions, including the donors, a narrative explanation of the contributions and other information as necessary (if applicable).

The applicants should estimate the amount of cost-sharing resources to be mobilized over the life of the agreement and specify the sources of such resources, and the basis of calculation in the budget narrative. Applicants should also provide a breakdown of the cost share (financial and in-kind contributions) of all organizations involved in implementing the resulting Cooperative Agreement. Please note that cost share is not required under this NOFO.

Other Direct Costs – This may include other costs not elsewhere specified, such as report preparation costs, passports and visas fees, medical exams and inoculations, as well as any other miscellaneous costs which directly benefit the program proposed by the applicant. The applicant should indicate the subject, venue and duration of any proposed conferences and seminars, and their relationship to the objectives of the program, along with estimates of costs. Otherwise, the narrative should be minimal.

Indirect Costs – Applicants must indicate whether they are proposing indirect costs or will charge all costs directly. In order to better understand indirect costs please see Subpart E of 2 CFR 200. The application must identify which approach they are requesting and provide the applicable supporting information. Below are the most commonly used Indirect Cost Rate methods:

Method 1 – Direct Charge Only Eligibility: Any applicant
Initial Application Requirements: See above on direct costs

Method 2 – Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA)
Eligibility: Any applicant with a NICRA issued by a USG Agency must use that NICRA. Initial Application Requirements: If the applicant has a current NICRA, submit your approved NICRA and the associated disclosed practices. If your NICRA was issued by an Agency other than USAID, provide the contact information for the approving Agency. Additionally, at the Agency’s discretion, a provisional rate may be set forth in the award subject to audit and finalization. See USAID’s Indirect Cost Rate Guide for Non Profit Organizations for further guidance.

Method 3 – De minimis rate of 10% of modified total direct costs (MTDC) Eligibility: Any applicant that does not have a current NICRA.
Initial Application Requirements: Costs must be consistently charged as either indirect or direct costs, but may not be double charged or inconsistently charged as both. If chosen, this methodology once elected must be used consistently for all Federal awards until such time as a non-Federal entity chooses to negotiate an indirect rate, which the non-Federal entity may apply to do at any time. The applicant must describe which cost elements it charges indirectly vs. directly. See 2 CFR 200 for further information.

Method 4 – Indirect Costs Charged As A Fixed Amount
Eligibility: Non U.S. non-profit organizations without a NICRA may request, but approval is at the discretion of the AO.
Initial Application Requirements: Provide the proposed fixed amount and a worksheet that includes the following:
Total costs incurred by the organization for the previous fiscal year and estimates for the current year. Guidance to AO: If the indirect costs are expected to be minimal or easily attributed to performance of a USAID agreement, the AO should delete this first bullet.
Indirect costs (common costs that benefit the day-to-day operations of the organization, including categories such as salaries and expenses of executive officers, personnel administration, and accounting, or that benefit and are identifiable to more than one program or activity, such as depreciation, rental costs, operations and maintenance of facilities, and telephone expenses) for the previous fiscal year and estimates for the current year.
Proposed method for prorating the indirect costs equitably and consistently across all programs and activities of using a base that measures the benefits of that particular cost to each program or activity to which the cost applies.

If the applicant does not have an approved NICRA and does not elect to utilize the 10% de minimis rate, the Agreement Officer will provide further instructions and may request additional supporting information, including financial statements and audits, should the application still be under consideration after the merit review. USAID is under no obligation to approve the applicant’s requested method.

Prior Approvals in accordance with 2 CFR 200.407

Inclusion of an item of cost in the detailed application budget does not satisfy any requirements for prior approval by the Agency. If the applicant would like the award to reflect approval of any cost elements for which prior written approval is specifically required for allowability, the applicant must specify and justify that cost. See 2 CFR 200.407 for information regarding which cost elements require prior written approval.

Approval of Subawards

The applicant must submit information for all subawards that it wishes to have approved at the time of award. For each proposed subaward the applicant must provide the following:

Name of organization
Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number
Confirmation that the subrecipient does not appear on the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) list
Confirmation that the subrecipient does not have active exclusions in the System for
Award Management (SAM)
Confirmation that the subrecipient is not listed in the United Nations Security designation list
Confirmation that the subrecipient is not suspended or debarred
Confirmation that the applicant has completed a risk assessment of the subrecipient, in accordance with 2 CFR 200.332(b)
Any negative findings as a result of the risk assessment and the applicant’s plan for mitigation.

Dun and Bradstreet and SAM Requirements

USAID may not award to an applicant unless the applicant has complied with all applicable unique entity identifier (DUNS number) and System for Award Management (SAM) requirements. Each applicant (unless the applicant is an individual or Federal awarding agency that is exempted from requirements under 2 CFR 25.110(b) or (c), or has an exception approved by the Federal awarding agency under 2 CFR 25.110(d)) is required to:

Provide a valid DUNS number for the applicant and all proposed sub-recipients;
Be registered in SAM before submitting its application. SAM is streamlining processes, eliminating the need to enter the same data multiple times, and consolidating hosting to make the process of doing business with the government more efficient (www.beta.sam.gov).
Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal awarding agency.

The registration process may take many weeks to complete. Therefore, applicants are encouraged to begin the process early. If an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements above by the time USAID is ready to make an award, USAID may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive an award and use that determination as a basis for making an award to another applicant.

DUNS number: http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform
SAM registration: https://sam.gov/content/home

Non-U.S. applicants can find additional resources for registering in SAM, including a Quick Start Guide and a video on how to obtain an NCAGE code, on www.beta.sam.gov, navigate to Help, then to International Registrants.

History of Performance

The applicant must provide information regarding its recent history of performance for all its cost-reimbursement contracts, grants, or cooperative agreements involving similar or related programs, not to exceed three years, as follows:
Name of the Awarding Organization;
Award Number;
Activity Title;
A brief description of the activity;
Period of Performance;
Award Amount;
Reports and findings from any audits performed in the last three years; and
Name of at least two updated professional contacts who most directly observed the work at the organization for which the service was performed with complete current contact information including telephone number, and e-mail address for each proposed individual.

If the applicant encountered problems on any of the referenced Awards, it may provide a short explanation and the corrective action taken. The applicant should not provide general information on its performance. USAID reserves the right to obtain relevant information concerning an applicant’s history of performance from any sources and may consider such information in its review of the applicant’s risk. The Agency may request additional information and conduct a pre-award survey if it determines that it is necessary to inform the risk assessment.

Branding Strategy & Marking Plan

USAID marking requirements have been waived for all LAC/Cuba program activities in accordance with Approved USAID Memorandum, “Marking Requirements Waiver for All Cuba Programs.”

Funding Restrictions

Profit is not allowable for recipients or subrecipients under this award. See 2 CFR 200.331 for assistance in determining whether a sub-tier entity is a subrecipient or contractor.

Construction will not be authorized under this award.

USAID will not allow the reimbursement of pre-award costs under this award without the explicit written approval of the Agreement Officer.

Except as may be specifically approved in advance by the AO, all commodities and services that will be reimbursed by USAID under this award must be from the authorized geographic code specified in Section B.4 of this NOFO and must meet the source and nationality requirements set forth in 22 CFR 228.

Conflict of Interest Pre-Award Term

Conflict of interest is defined as follows and must be avoided:
Personal Conflict of Interest
An actual or appearance of a conflict of interest exists when an applicant organization or an employee of the organization has a relationship with an Agency official involved in the competitive award decision-making process that could affect that Agency official’s impartiality. The term “conflict of interest” includes situations in which financial or other personal considerations may compromise, or have the appearance of compromising, the obligations and duties of a USAID employee or recipient employee.
The applicant must provide conflict of interest disclosures when it submits an SF-424. Should the applicant discover a previously undisclosed conflict of interest after submitting the application, the applicant must disclose the conflict of interest to the AO no later than ten (10) calendar days following discovery.

Organizational Conflict of Interest
The applicant must notify USAID of any actual or potential conflict of interest that they are aware of that may provide the applicant with an unfair competitive advantage in competing for this financial assistance award. Examples of an unfair competitive advantage include but are not limited to situations in which an applicant or the applicant’s employee gained access to non-public information regarding a federal assistance funding opportunity, or an applicant or applicant’s employee was substantially involved in the preparation of a federal assistance funding opportunity.
USAID will promptly take appropriate action upon receiving any such notification from the applicant.

Checklist of Required Application Submissions

❏ Technical Application
Cover Page (not to exceed one page)
Table of Contents (not to exceed one page)
Executive Summary (not to exceed two pages)
Technical Approach (not to exceed eight pages)
❏ Annex 1: Draft Implementation Plan (not to exceed three pages)
❏ Annex 2: Draft Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning (MEL) Plan (not to exceed three pages)
❏ Annex 3: Program Management Approach (not to exceed three pages)
❏ Annex 4: Key Personnel – Resumes (each resume must not exceed two pages)
❏ Annex 5: Organizational Chart (not to exceed one page)
❏ Annex 6: Organizational Capacity (not to exceed two pages)
❏ Annex 7: Organization Matrix of Projects (not to exceed two pages)
❏ Annex 8: Cuba Commodities List (not to exceed two pages, if applicable)
❏ Cost Application
SF-424 forms (found on www.grants.gov) as follows:
SF-424, Application for Federal Assistance
SF-424A, Budget Information – Non-construction Programs
SF-424B, Assurances – Non-construction Programs
An Excel spreadsheet with all cells and formulas visible that includes a summary budget (in U.S. dollars) and a detailed/itemized budget (in U.S. dollars).
Budget Narrative in MS Word or PDF format explaining all costs to be incurred.
Supporting Documentation

[END OF SECTION D]

SECTION E: APPLICATION REVIEW INFORMATION

MERIT REVIEW CRITERIA

USAID will conduct a merit review of all applications received that complies with the instructions in this NOFO in accordance with the following evaluation criteria. USAID plans to award one or two cooperative agreements to Applicant(s) that best meet all technical evaluation criteria and cost considerations, with emphasis on the Applicant’s technical proposal. Only one Cooperative Agreement shall be awarded per organization. Shortly after the submission deadline, USAID will review the applications according to the evaluation criteria set forth below. While Applicants should be certain to address the evaluation criteria to receive the highest possible score, they should also be sure to provide the detailed information requested in the “Instructions” found in Section D.

The evaluation criteria have been tailored to this particular solicitation and identify the attributes required to implement the proposed program. These criteria serve to: a) identify the key areas of importance and programmatic emphasis which Applicants should address in their applications; and, b) set the standard against which all applications will be evaluated.

Other Factors to Be Considered

The Agreement Officer will perform a pre-award risk assessment in accordance with the principles established by USAID and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) (see 2 CFR 200.205).

As per ADS 303.3.9 (dated 02/04/2021), a positive risk assessment means that the applicant possesses or has the ability to obtain the necessary management competence to plan and carry out the assistance program to be funded, and that the applicant will practice mutually agreed upon methods of accountability for funds and other assets provided by USAID.

If USAID’s review of the full application results in a recommendation for funding, then the organization and USAID will enter final discussions to ensure all pre-award requirements are met and significant grant terms are negotiated and agreed. The exact details will vary according to the circumstances pertaining to each application; however, the following are common areas that require discussion and agreement prior to award:

Payment terms;
Procedures concerning administrative reporting and logistical requirements for the program including training components;
Cost sharing is not mandatory; therefore, cost sharing will not be evaluated or included in the merit or cost review.
Other award terms including audit, special provisions, and/or special award conditions.

Cost will not be assigned a score but will be evaluated for cost reasonableness, allocability, and allowability. While cost may be a determining factor in the final award(s) decision, the technical merit of applications is substantially more important under this NOFO. Consideration will be given to the applicant’s understanding of the NOFO requirements and consistency with the technical application.

REVIEW AND SELECTION PROCESS

Technical applications will be evaluated in accordance with the evaluation criteria set forth below by a Selection Committee (SC) comprised of USAID employees, and, if necessary, other
U.S. Government representatives or other technical experts. The team of technical experts will review and score applications received in response to this NOFO.

The Agreement Officer is the only individual who may legally commit the U.S. Government to the expenditure of public funds. No costs chargeable to the proposed Agreement may be incurred before receipt of either an Agreement signed by the Agreement Officer or a specific, written authorization from the Agreement Officer.

Criteria Identification – The evaluation of applications will be completed using the following merit review criteria in rank order of importance. Applicants should note that these criteria serve to: (a) identify the significant matters which Applicants should address in their applications and
(b) set the standard against which all applications will be evaluated.

Technical Evaluation

Technical Approach:

Instructions to Applicant & Evaluation Criteria:
The technical application sets forth a convincing concept, effective strategy, and techniques for accomplishing the stated objectives and anticipated results outlined in this NOFO.
The technical approach presents a well-developed, informed and sound program strategy, including an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the constraints and strategic priorities in Cuba and how these risks and assumptions will be mitigated and addressed.
The proposed concept is unique and innovative and is not a continuation or duplication of other current or previous USG-funded Cuba programs.
The technical application describes how proposed local networks or groups are ideal for the activities to be implemented, and how a wider recruitment process will be conducted
in order to have a wide range of program participants from across the island, not just in Havana.
The application articulates how marginalized communities and their specific needs will be incorporated into program activities.
The technical application takes into account the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic when describing proposed activities.

The following sections will be evaluated as part of the Applicant’s Technical Approach:
the Executive Summary and Technical Approach sections of the Technical Application; and
the Draft Implementation Plan (Annex 1).

Organizational Capability:

Instructions to Applicant & Evaluation Criteria:
The application demonstrates the Applicant’s ability to employ the necessary organizational resources to achieve program objectives in a restrictive operating environment.
The application has a well-integrated approach for the roles and responsibilities of any proposed partners and/or subrecipients.
The organization (as the prime or subrecipient) has experience implementing projects in Cuba or other similar contexts.
The Applicant has a proven ability to monitor and evaluate program implementation and to effectively report results and impact.

The following sections will be evaluated as part of the Organizational Capability criteria:
The Draft Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (MEL) Plan (Annex 2);
Organizational Chart (Annex 5);
Organizational Capacity (Annex 6); and
Organization Matrix of Projects (Annex 7).

Management Structure and Staffing Plan:

Instructions to Applicant & Evaluation Criteria:
The application includes a well-organized management plan that includes a staffing structure and division of responsibilities to effectively administer program activities and achieve program objectives in restrictive operating environments.
Key personnel have the experience and demonstrated success implementing programs or activities that are directly related to or similar in scope, magnitude, sensitivity, and complexity to that detailed in this NOFO.
The proposed Key Personnel have experience working in closed societies, with a preference for experience in Cuba.
The application provides the names and curriculum vitae for the two key personnel to be assigned to the program; the two key personnel meet the preferred requirements outlined in Section D, Annex 3.

The following sections will be evaluated as part of the Management Structure and Staffing Plan:
Program Management Approach (Annex 3); and
Key Personnel Resumes (Annex 4).

Overall Rating: The following sections with be evaluated in order of descending importance:
Technical Approach
Organizational Capability
Management Structure and Staffing Plan

Business Review

The Agency will evaluate the cost application of the applicant(s) under consideration for an award as a result of the merit criteria review to determine whether the costs are allowable in accordance with the cost principles found in 2 CFR 200 Subpart E.

The Agency will also consider (1) the extent of the applicant’s understanding of the financial aspects of the program and the applicant’s ability to perform the activities within the amount requested; (2) whether the applicant’s plans will achieve the program objectives with reasonable economy and efficiency; and (3) whether any special conditions relating to costs should be included in the award.

Proposed cost share, if provided, will be reviewed for compliance with the standards set forth in 2 CFR 200.306, 2 CFR 700.10, and the Standard Provision “Cost Sharing (Matching)” for U.S. entities, or the Standard Provision “Cost Share” for non-U.S. entities.

The AO will perform a risk assessment (2 CFR 200.206). The AO may determine that a pre- award survey is required to inform the risk assessment in determining whether the prospective recipient has the necessary organizational, experience, accounting and operational controls, financial resources, and technical skills – or ability to obtain them – in order to achieve the objectives of the program and comply with the terms and conditions of the award. Depending on the result of the risk assessment, the AO will decide to execute the award, not execute the award, or award with “specific conditions” (2 CFR 200.208).

[END OF SECTION E]

SECTION F: FEDERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION

Federal Award Notices

Award of the agreement contemplated by this NOFO cannot be made until funds have been appropriated, allocated and committed through internal USAID procedures. While USAID anticipates that these procedures will be successfully completed, potential applicants are hereby notified of these requirements and conditions for the award. The Agreement Officer is the only individual who may legally commit the Government to the expenditure of public funds. No costs chargeable to the proposed Agreement may be incurred before receipt of either a fully executed Agreement or a specific, written authorization from the Agreement Officer.

Administrative & National Policy Requirements

The resulting award(s) shall be made and administered in accordance with the following federal regulations:

For U.S. organizations in accordance with 2 CFR 700, 2 CFR 200, and the applicable Standard Provisions;
For Non-U.S. nongovernmental organizations in accordance with 2 CFR 200, the Standard Provisions for Non-US Non-Governmental Organizations;
Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Part 31 for Commercial Organizations;
USAID’s Automated Directives System (ADS) Series 300, Chapter 303, “Grants and Cooperative Agreements to Non-Governmental Organizations,” which may be found at https://www.usaid.gov/ads/policy/300/303.
See Annex 1 at the end of this NOFO, for a list of Standard Provisions that will be applicable to any awards resulting from this NOFO.

Reporting Requirements

The types and frequency of financial and programmatic reports are detailed in 2 CFR 200.

Financial Reporting: The Recipient must submit via email a copy of the Standard Form 425 (SF-425) on a quarterly basis to the Agreement Officer (AO) and the Agreement Officer’s Representative (AOR) within thirty (30) calendar days after the end of the quarter. Electronic copies of the SF-425 can be found at:
https://www.grants.gov/forms/post-award-reporting-forms.html Line item instructions for completing the SF-425 can be found at:
https://www.grants.gov/forms/post-award-reporting-forms.html

Performance Reporting: USAID expects high quality reports in English. Reports must be professionally executed, avoiding typographical and grammatical errors. Each of the reports must be submitted electronically to the Agreement Officer’s Representative (AOR) in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, or PDF format, as directed by the AOR.

Standard Provisions

This NOFO incorporates in full text the standard provisions applicable to the NOFO. The resulting awards will incorporate the Mandatory and Required as Applicable Provisions, depending on the type of program area, the type of organization, and funding involved. More information can be found at http://www.usaid.gov/who-we-are/agency-policy

[END OF SECTION F]

SECTION G: FEDERAL AWARDING AGENCY CONTACT(S)

The point of contact for this NOFO and any questions during the NOFO process are as follows:

Maria Munoz Agreement Officer USAID M/OAA/SIDP
1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington, DC 20523 mamunoz@usaid.gov

Any prospective applicant desiring an explanation or interpretation of this NOFO must request it in writing by the date listed on the cover letter to allow a reply to reach all prospective applicants before the submission of their applications. Oral explanations or instructions given before the award will not be binding. Any information given to a prospective applicant concerning this NOFO will be furnished promptly to all other prospective applicants as an amendment of this NOFO, if that information is necessary in submitting applications or if the lack of it would be prejudicial to any other prospective applicants.

[END OF SECTION G]

SECTION H: OTHER INFORMATION

Special Provisions and Licensing Requirements for Cuba

Licensing Requirements for Cuba

The Cuban Democracy Act of 1992 and the Libertad Act of 1996, under which the activities financed under this NOFO are authorized, provide authority to carry out activities through individuals and nongovernmental organizations to promote a peaceful transition to democracy in Cuba. The Treasury and Commerce Departments regulate trade and trafficking of goods in Cuba. The Treasury Department maintains and enforces licensing requirements for travel to Cuba, expenditures of funds on the island and remittances of cash to Cuba. The Commerce Department maintains and enforces licensing requirements of all U.S.-origin goods to Cuba.

The Department of Treasury has provided USAID with a general license to cover USAID recipients/subrecipients traveling to Cuba under this program and expenses they may incur while carrying out program activities on the island. USAID Recipients must comply with the terms of this license and Department of Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) rules and procedures.

All USAID Recipients intending to provide certain equipment and supplies to recipients in Cuba are responsible for meeting licensing requirements as set forth in the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) (15 C.F.R. Part 730 et seq.). Part 734 defines the scope of items subject to the EAR.

Certain transactions to Cuba may be eligible for a license exception if the transaction meets all terms and conditions listed in the EAR. Part 740 describes the terms and conditions for license exceptions. USAID draws your attention to Section 746.2 of the EAR which states the licensing policy for Cuba and lists license exceptions. See also Section 740.19, which lists certain license exceptions for Consumer Communications Devices (commodities and software), Section 740.12 on gift parcels and humanitarian donations, and Supplement No. 2 to Part 740, which lists items that may be donated under the humanitarian license exception. Note that while a transaction may be exempted from licensing, certain excepted transactions may still require detailed documentation under the EAR. USAID Recipients are responsible for meeting all documentation requirements.

A Recipient’s Commerce license is not transferable to its sub-recipients. Each sub- recipient under this award is individually responsible for meeting all licensing requirements under the EAR. The initial penalty for failure to comply with licensing requirements is $250,000. A standard penalty includes four related violations totaling approximately $100,000 in fines.
For general information concerning the license application process and licensing policy, please consult the Bureau of Industry and Security’s (BIS) website at www.bis.doc.gov which includes a link to the EAR. USAID Recipients are encouraged to attend a BIS training workshop to better understand the licensing process and requirements. Check the BIS website for the training schedule. If you need assistance with filing a license application, please call the Outreach and Educational Services Division at (202) 482-4811. If you have questions concerning licensing policy, please call the Foreign Policy Division at (202) 482-4252.

If the Recipient contemplates sending private (non-Federal) funds to Cuba to further the objectives of this Agreement and such funds would constitute the Recipient’s “counterpart funds” under the Agreement, the Treasury Department’s License No. CU-2014-312739-1 should permit the Recipient to send such funds to Cuba to carry out activities authorized under the Cuban Democracy Act. However, it is recommended that all Recipients intending to introduce funds into Cuba seek confirmation from Treasury/OFAC that the use of private Recipient funds is covered by the existing license.

If the non-Federal funds are covered by an appropriate license and such use of counterpart funds is contemplated under the scope of the Agreement, cash contributions would count toward any cost-sharing requirements that the Recipient may have, assuming that the other cost-sharing criteria found in 2 CFR 200 have been met.

Information regarding U.S./Cuba legal and/or policy requirements may be found at the following websites:

U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC): http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/sanctions/Programs/pages/cuba.aspx
OFAC Cuba FAQs: http://www.treasury.gov/resource- center/sanctions/Programs/Documents/cuba_faqs_new.pdf
U.S. Department of Commerce Cuba page for exports: http://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/policy-guidance/country- guidance/sanctioned-destinations/cuba
State Department Fact Sheet on U.S. Relations With Cuba: https://www.state.gov/u-s-relations-with-cuba/ https://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2886.htm
USAID and Assistance Awards Policies: https://www.usaid.gov/ads/policy/300/303

Cuban Democracy Act and Libertad Act

This Cooperative Agreement is made pursuant to the authorities of the Cuban Democracy Act of 1992. 22 U.S.C. 6001 et. seq., Sec. 6004, (“CDA”) and the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (Libertad) Act of 1996, 22 U.S.C. Sec. 6021 et. seq., Sec.6039, (“Libertad Act”). Activities authorized and financed under this Cooperative Agreement are governed and limited by the terms of the CDA and the Libertad Act.

The CDA and the Libertad Act authorize assistance through nongovernmental organizations to support individuals and independent nongovernmental organizations to promote peaceful, nonviolent democratic change in Cuba through various types of democracy-building efforts for Cuba. The Recipient agrees that funds made available under this Cooperative Agreement will only be utilized for peaceful, nonviolent activities, in accordance with the CDA and the Libertad Act.

No funds or assistance under Cooperative Agreements resulting from this NOFO may be provided to the Cuban Government, as stated in the Libertad Act. The Libertad Act, 22 U.S.C. Sec. 6023(1) and (5), defines “Cuban Government” as including the government of any political subdivision of Cuba, and also any “agency or instrumentality” of the Government of Cuba, as these terms are further defined in 28 U.S.C. Sec. 1603(b). Section 1603(b) states that an organization which is either a) an “organ of a foreign state or political subdivision thereof” (here an organ of the Cuban Government), or b) “a majority of whose shares or other ownership interest is owned by a foreign state or political subdivision thereof” is an “agency or instrumentality of a foreign state,” thus ineligible for funding under this Cooperative Agreement. Employees of the Government of Cuba, as defined above, are also ineligible for assistance under this Cooperative Agreement while working in their official capacities. However, such persons, while not working in their official capacities as employees of the Cuban Government, are considered as individuals and are eligible for assistance. Furthermore, merely providing information on transitions to democracy, human rights, and market economies to individuals who are Cuban Government employees is not considered assistance to the Cuban Government, because the information is offered to these persons as individuals, and does not benefit the current Government of Cuba.

Conference Report to the Libertad Act, H.R. 104-468, page 50, clarifies that “incidental payments or indirect benefits to commercial or regulatory entities of the Cuban Government, e.g., payments for hotels, car rental, travel or transportation to or within the island, purchases of other goods or services in the local economy, customs fees, migration fees, or other comparable government charges” are not considered to be assistance to the Cuban Government which is prohibited by the Libertad Act.

The Recipient shall take all reasonable steps necessary to ensure that the above special provisions (a)-(d) are followed. Violation of special provision (b) above is grounds for termination of this Cooperative Agreement for cause and disallowance of costs incurred. Violation of special provision (c) may lead to disallowance of costs incurred.

Due to the political sensitivity of the USAID Cuba Program, USAID does not require any attribution to USAID or to the U.S. Government in any materials that will be distributed on the island.

Given the nature of the Cuban regime and the political sensitivity of the USAID Program, USAID cannot be held responsible for any injury or inconvenience suffered by individuals traveling to the island under USAID grant funding.

Compliance with U.S. Laws and Regulations

All USAID Cuba Program partners are reminded that they are expected to comply with all terms of their Cooperative Agreements as well as with all U.S. laws and USG regulations. This includes but is not limited to the following:

Recipients must observe U.S. laws that protect copyrights and other intellectual property. Without advance written permission from holders of copyrights, Recipients may not copy books, videos, audio cassettes, CDs, computer software and other informational materials for dissemination in the U.S. or elsewhere, or for distribution inside Cuba.

Because of the First Amendment to the Constitution, Recipients may not use USG funds to purchase, copy, mail, or distribute religious or anti-religious materials.

Grantees and their sub-recipients may not send any equipment to Cuba without first meeting Department of Commerce licensing requirements as set forth in the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) (15 C.F.R. Part 730 et seq.), no matter who requests the equipment or how it is sent. Refer to Section VIII.A.1(c) above.

Non-Federal Audits and Financial Reviews

In accordance with 2 CFR 200, the Recipient and its sub-recipients are subject to the audit requirements contained in the Single Audit Act Amendments of 1996 (31 U.S.C. 7501–7507). The Recipient and its sub-recipients must use an independent, non-Federal auditor or audit organization which meets the general standards specified in generally accepted government auditing standards (GAGAS) to fulfill these requirements.

Under the LAC/Cuba program, additional financial reviews and audits may be required.

Special Travel Liability Clause for Cuba

Disclosure and Assumption of Risk: Certain activities under this Cooperative Agreement will be performed in Cuba. Working in a closed society, such as Cuba, presents particular challenges and risks to the Recipient (including its subrecipients, consultants, etc.). The U.S. government cannot ensure the safety and security of Recipient assets and personnel, particularly as relates to individuals traveling to Cuba under USAID funding, or project staff based in Cuba. Implementation of USAID programs in Cuba requires Recipient awareness of political sensitivities and assumption of risks associated with hostile actions of the Cuban government.

The Recipient will not serve as an agent or act under the direction of USAID and will be responsible for the efficient and effective administration of its own programs with sound business judgment, including any precautions inherent therein. USAID will reimburse costs to the extent allowable (i.e., reasonable and allocable to the grant) up to the stated amount of the grant. To the extent not prohibited or contradicted elsewhere by Federal law, regulation, or policy, the Recipient shall not hold USAID liable for injury, death, detainment, incarceration, kidnapping, property loss, damages, or expenses incidental to those liabilities, suffered by, or attributable to the acts, omissions or negligence of, the Recipient, its agents, or its employees implementing programs in Cuba under this NOFO.

Consultants and Travelers

Special thought and consideration should be given to the selection of consultants and other individuals who may be required to travel to Cuba. It is preferable for these travelers to speak Spanish fluently, possess a solid understanding of the cultural context, and have prior experience on the island, in order to maximize their effectiveness in this unique operating environment. To the extent possible, travel by U.S. citizens should be avoided.

[END OF SECTION H]
ANNEX 1 – STANDARD PROVISIONS

Note: the full text of these provisions may be found at: https://www.usaid.gov/ads/policy/300/303maa https://www.usaid.gov/ads/policy/300/303mab
The actual Standard Provisions included in the award will be dependent on the organization that is selected. The award will include the latest Mandatory Provisions for either U.S. or non-U.S. non-governmental organizations. The award will also contain the following “required as
applicable” Standard Provisions:

Please note that the resulting award will include all standard provisions (both mandatory and required as applicable) in full text.

REQUIRED AS APPLICABLE STANDARD PROVISIONS FOR U.S. NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

REQUIRED AS APPLICABLE STANDARD PROVISIONS FOR NON-U.S. NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

ANNEX 2 – ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

ADS Automated Directive System
AO Agreement Officer
AOR Agreement Officer’s Representative
BIS Bureau of Industry and Security
CDA Cuban Democracy Act
CFR Code of Federal Regulations
COP Chief of Party
CSO Civil Society Organizations
DRL Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor DUNS Data Universal Numbering System EAR Export Administration Regulations
FAA Foreign Assistance Act of 1961
FAQs Frequently Asked Questions
FAR Federal Acquisition Regulations
LAC Latin America and the Caribbean
LGBTQI+ Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer & intersex
LIBERTAD Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity Act
MEL Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning
NGO Non-Governmental Organization NOFO Notice of Funding Opportunity OAA Office of Acquisition & Assistance OFAC Office of Foreign Assets Control RFA Request for Applications
SAM System for Award Management
SC Selection Committee
SF Standard Form
USAID U.S. Agency for International Development
USG United States Government
WHA Western Hemisphere Affairs

3 thoughts on “$2 million up for grabs for democracy projects in Cuba”

  1. Does this project (Cuba Money Project), something like the Belly of the Beast, serve as a more liberal arm of US policy? Compared to the more aggressive, coupmongering policy put forth by hawkish folks in DOS/USAID/CIA/etc.?

    Reply

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